What makes a toilet seat ADA compliant?

What makes a toilet seat ADA compliant
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Why do we have toHaving a family member with a disability comes with so many responsibilities. Not just for the people with disabilities but also for the people that have been immobile due to various reasons such as health issues, genetic disorders, or road accidents.

Using ordinary toilets is not possible for these people so the ADA or the Americans with disabilities act regulation has certain criteria that are mandatory to be met. This regulation is to keep the welfare of the differently-abled people out there. So, there are certain aspects that you have to keep in mind to meet the specifications as per the ADA guidelines.

Why do we have to?

If at all this question pops into your mind, then let me tell you that anybody that isn’t like the rest of us needs some special care to survive in this world. Not being normal makes you different, but it does not make you disabled. So to support these people with different abilities, we must provide them with what is necessary. A person with spine issues can’t sit in a toilet seat with a lower height. There is a prescribed height and style required to support these people.

So, what makes a toilet ADA compliant?

So, what makes a toilet ADA compliantYes, height is an important factor:

To comply with ADA regulations the toilet seat must be 17 to 19 inches above the ground level. Hence, make sure you measure the height with a measuring tape.

Space! Is an important factor as well:

ADA recommends toilets that have an undercut bowl since it is necessary for toe clearance. As per the ADA guideline, there should be a gap of 9 inches beneath an element, for example., the toilet and the floor. A bowl with a gap between its bottom area and the base of the toilet is called an undercut bowl. It seems this tends to give more foot space.

Read the label thoroughly:

The label might say that the toilet is of “chair height” or “ standard height” which is quite misleading, most of the time. You have to check if the so-called standard height fits into the ADA guidelines.

Location matters!

Toilet seat for disabled people has to be in an appropriate location to make sure it doesn’t take too much effort for the person to reach the toilet seat. Also, to make sure they have a proper grip while they sit, the toilet area must have bars beside the toilet seat. Log on to justhomedesign.com for more amazing information.

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